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to world leaders. such as the leaders of including the former president george hw bush, and george w bush, anybody that serves on the world stage will get their invitations on day 3, and then starting on day 5,dy. four is a logistical day, when you will see the first public funeral, and it will happen at the soccer stadium, where they held the world cup in 2010, 94,000 people, you can imagine the kind of long lines will be just for the public to get into the state memorial service. nelson mandela's body will be moved. on day seven, that's when his body will lie in state. and then undawning and then finally on day 10, is when things ram up with the private family burial. so every day there will be pictures and opportunities for the world to express its condom lenses and grief and this is the initial planning. well, each day is pretty much firm. they are fearful that the number of clouds and logistics coordinating so many wormed leaders is not something that south africa may have been preparing for. they anticipate it, but coordinating is nothing like they have seen since the death of i don
with three sitting american properties. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met nelson mandela in 2005, when barack obama was a senator. after one term as president nelson mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a number of causes. >> when south africa hosted the world cup tournament in 2010, he made his last public appearance. the crowd honoured him to thunderous ovation. >> his third wife, graca machel, former first lady of mozambique, was at his side during prostate cancer and lingering lung infections. >> never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. the sun never set on so glorious a human achievement. let freedom rain. god bless africa. >> nelson mandela, an enduring father of the new south africa dead at 95. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew par
for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >>> cnn has learned the former president george w. bush and the former first lady laura bush will accompany president obama on air force one to attend nelson mandela's memorial services next week. bill clinton tells me he and his family also will be attending. george h.w. bush will not be making the trip due to his age and the long, long distance. our correspondents in south africa are also learning more about the upcoming historic events. cnn's robyn curnow is joining us from johannesburg and erin burnett is joining us from mandela's home in the town of soweto. it is early morning now, crowds have been out nonstop celebrating the life of nelson mandela. what's going on, how long do we expect this to last? >> reporter: well, it's almost 24 hours since this nation heard that nelson mandela had passed away. we are standing right outside the house where he died late thursday. people have been coming to this suburban street since then. you can hear them now singing behind me, and they have been chanting, praying, lamenting, celebrating in song
said. and send our condolences. former president george w bush, are among those expressing condolences. they release add statement that said that president mandela is one of the great fors for equality for his time. and a world is better off because of his example. this great man will be missed but his contributions will live on forever. there has been a flood of also reactions from dignitaries, i suppose you can call them. i know you mentioned the end of last year, prominently at his museum feature as picture of him with nelson mandela. they had shared many events and the picture that ali has featured includes basically seen nelson pretending to box him. mo hamed ali issues this statement, says he taught us forgiveness on a grand scale, his was a spirit born free. today his spirit is soaring through the heavens he is now forever free. finally overseas also been a lot of reaction from international leaders, former leaders. he issues this statement saying through his dignity, grace, and quality of performance, not just immoral but stupid. in his place he put the right of all human kind
george w. bush and his wife laura will join the obama's when they travel to south africa. we have this report. >> the flag at the white house flies at half mast in honor of a man who means much to america. inside on the desk of the u.s.'s thereblack president sits out oh, a memento of their first meeting. when obama visited the present on robben island in south africa he told his doubters of the link mandela, gandhi, and martin luther king. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. it will fall to us as best we the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. also do not discount the difference one person can make to drive for future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> nelson mandela was feted in washington but his struggle against apartheid divided this country. not taken off the terrorist list into 2008. he was welcomed as south africa's president and warm hugs from the first lady who went out to be secretary of state. she told the bbc, people should warn and celebrate. >> we have so much still to from hism him, example, from his unde
george h.w. bush said the following. >> president clinton was in the white house when mandela was elected president of south africa. clinton saying the following. >> former president jimmy carter paying tribute to nelson mandela saying, his passion for freedom and justice created new hope for generations that have impressed people worldwide. the president of the united states often referred to as the leader of the free world but yet you can see from the statements in each of these men, they were in awe of nelson mandela. >> and a simple beginning to life. when you look at the place where he is going to be buried and cnn will be taking you through the days of mourning, ten days of morning in sfrouth africa. he had the desire to be buried in his hometown. >> he is going home. >> yes, he is going home. >> we will continue to bring you the life of nelson mandela all morning. >>> now to another big story. >> the weather. when we come back, we are going to tell you about this deadly winter storm that is wreaking havoc across our country. hundreds of flights have already been canceled. roads are
are weighing in as well. george w. bush welcoming mandela to the white house after his release from prison says nelson mandela had the remarkable capacity to forgive his jailers following 26 years of wrongful imprisonment and setting a powerful example of redemption and grace for us all. >> george w. bush sending condolences to the mandela family saying mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace and our world is a better place because of his example. >> president clinton who was in the white house when mandel was elected president of south africa. the two developed a close personal relationship. bill clinton says, quote, all of us are living in a better world because of the life that madiba lived. he proved that there is freedom in forgiving that a big heart is better than a closed mind and that life's real victories must be shared. >> jimmy carter also saying the following. to think of their parents and grandparents the different world they are seeing. we will have more coverage of nelson mandela's legacy still to come o
. they will be on board air force 1, riding with them some former residents of the white house, president george w. bush and mrs. bush. >>> another former president is remembering mandela today. president bill clinton, who talked with the anchor of this week, george stephanopoulos. >> he once told me that he lived on hatred, when he went into prison. he said after 11 years he realized that they had taken about everything they could take from him except his mind and heart. he said, i realized that those are things you have to give away, and i decided not to give them away. >> mahatma gandhi, abe lincoln, george washington. he belongs in that group. >> he does. you know, in my lifetime, gandhi and mandela, in no small measure, because of their willingness to give up the comforts of ordinary life, they symbolize the world we'd all like to live in, if we could just be a little bigger, if we could be a little more like them. >> president clinton with george stephanopoulos, president clinton once asked mandela if he still hated his oppressors, mandela answered, nope, they had me 27 years in prison, if i hated
reaction around the world and in the united states. former president george w. bush was president on the day in 1980 when nelson mandela walked free. he and barbara bush released a statement saying: >> i want to bring in congressman charlie ranble joining us from harlem. you met with nelson mandela after he was released from prison. can you take us back to that moment? >> well, i had no idea that the president would have known me. i was with a congressional delegation, and this was before the election, and ron brown, who was secretary of commerce, i was so awed for the rest of my life i was speechless. when he called this the bloody wrangle amendment which cut off united states doing business in south africa and thanks to me and america, i never thought i would meet a guy like that. there's something i'd like to say that i don't think others could be aware of. that is that he has given a gift to african-americans that i cannot think of anyone else giving. most people have history that they can talk about from countries all over the world. those of african dissent, they had names t
forget my friend, madi madiba. and on facebook, president george w. bush, president mandela was one of the forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace. and our world is better off because of his example. it's the type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white, to share feelings. charlize theron. my thoughts and love go out to the mandela family. rest in peace, madiba. you will be missed. but your impact on this world will last forever. spike lee posted this picture with a simple message. and then, there's this one from nasa. intergalactic reaction from the space shuttle, posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. and the crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from his own twitter account. death is something inevitable. when a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. a virtual memorial on social media. electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world together. jim avila, abc news, new york.
by george w. bush president---to get a bill passed through congress and we were able to do it. we were very happy with it but we didn't know exactly how it was going to work and i'm here to tell you, ten years later that 90% of the seniors voluntarily, not mandatory, but voluntarily signed up. and over 90% of these individuals say today that it's the best program for seniors out there. so i'm very happy with the turnaround and the support for part d. one thing that you can always point out, how popular it is not one democrat or republican has ever introduced legislation to repeal it. that shows you how popular it is. > >it shows you how things can change. it did have a troubled early stage during the rollout period. it was also the result of bipartisan support. you said there has been nobody to try and repeal it. even during the creation process. there were from both sides of the aisle a hand in making this happen. > >that is correct. that's why every chance in america we have been able to have transformative legislation it's always been done on a bipartisan basis. the afforable care act or
was the type of leader that when we put together the president's emergency plan for aids relief under george w. bush's administration, one of the key card key area -- one of the key criteria was to find leaders like nelson mandela and others who would speak forthrightly about the challenges, make sure there was no stigma in society, and a specialt to antiviral drugs. , what youdor frazer take away as their reaction to nelson mandela's death. ugabe, in zimbabwe, a colonial past. >> many would say that robert and nelson mandela, there was a little bit of a rivalry there, particularly on mugabe's part because when he became president of zimbabwe he was wrong respected globally -- he was well respected globally. his economy was starting to fail. it was not a redistribution of land. he then blamed it on the white population and dispossessed them of the land. president mandela when he came to power essentially compromised , and he was very clear he was going to move more slowly on the economic front so that he could to especiallyity the white population there, but there are still these challenges of
. >> former president george w. bush released a statement saying president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality in our time. he bore his burden with dignity and grace and our world is better off because of his example. this good man will be missed but his contributions will live on forever. many people taking to twitter to express condolences. russell simmons saying he's one of the greatest teacher the world has ever known. former president bill clinton simply tweeting, i will never friend, madiba. wife andvived by his three daughters. ken is back with us in writing the cover story on how far south africa had come in apartheid from a piece in 2010. thanks for coming back. president mandela was a big opponent of educational opportunity. it expanded during his time in office. how did that translate into job creation and economic growth? >> for the first time, one of the issues with apartheid is that there was an entire generation of young people who skipped any kind of education. they came in and totally changed that system and now you have blacks college-educated since t
forget my friend madiba and george w. bush, president mandela was one of the great forces of freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace and our world is better off because of his example. it's a type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white to share feelings. south african native access charlize theron. you will be missed but your impact will live forever. director spike lee posted this picture with a simple message and then this one from nasa. inter glass tick reaction from the space shuttle, posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. as crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from his own twitter account, death is something inevitable. when he does what he considers to be his duty to his country and his people, he can rest in pea peace. worldwide, electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world and the community together. >>> when we return right here, other news from the day including the latest on the huge ice storm millions of people in its path at th
example of redemption and grace for us all. president george w. bush wrote president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. mandela set an example by visiting new zealand, forgiving the country that sent its rugby team to play south africa during the apartheid years. tonight the prime minister of new zealand, john key wrote, mr. mandela was a force for change not only in south africa, but around the world. reacting tonight, muhammad ali wrote, his was a spirit born free. destined to soar above the rainbows. today his spirit is soaring through the heavens. he is now forever free. new york's cardinal dolan wrote, nelson mandela was a hero to the world. his bravery in defending human rights against the great evil of apartheid made him a symbol of courage and dignity as well as an inspiration to people everywhere. and mandela's great friend, archbishop foundation wrote in his name his fearless generosity and leadership were in the service of transcending our differences by seeking our oneness as human beings. and here's the "new york" magazine cover, a
president mandela to make this world better for all. former president george h.w. bush issued a statement saying of mandela, "he was a man of tremendous moral courage who changed the course of history in his country. and in another statement, former president jimmy carter said, "his passion for freedom and justice created new hope for generations of oppressed people worldwide. and now to a personal retrospective on the life of nelson mandela from one of our own. former "newshour" senior correspondent charlayne hunger gault covered the south african leader for more than a decade, and interviewed him on a number of occasions, from the time he left prison to his election as south africa's president. she prepared this remembrance. >> to my generation, the onetha, nelson mandela was a towering man of myth and legend, of action and passion, of selfless sacrifice and before any of us dreamed he became the embodiment of a notorious decades long struggling against oppression, these were images from the book, mandela, the authorized portrait, helps tell the story of mandela's long road to freedom,.
clinton tweeting this photo with this caption, i will nevertheless forget my friend. and george w. bush posting, he was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace. he will be miss but his contributions will live on forever. >>> and john boehner tweeted. and condoleeza rice posting, throughout history a few special people have been able to transcend differences and change theor the better. nelson mandela is one of those people. samuel l. jackson tweeting. and mike tyson tweeting this picture with this caption i'm hearing about nelson mandela's death, sending prayers to his family. and coming up, more coverage of the breaking news, the death of former south african president nelson mandela. . >>> tonight the news breaking around the world, former south african president, nelson mandela has died. he dismantled south africa's apartheid system and became the country's first black president. you know, it's a sad night to us although we look at the people around mandela's house and they look to accept it better than the rest of the
president george w. bush entered the white house mandela was out of office in south africa but still an annoyance to the bush administration. after president bush said the iraq war was about liberation mandela famously said was all he wanted was iraqi oil. now, however, the for nelson mandela the flags have been lowered to half-staff and a reminder that a string of u.s. leaders at some moments in time a subversive threat. vet often sometimes the administration treaded carefully with mandela. after the comments regarding the iraq war, h president bush said that he was a great leader but on iraq they have a disagreement. >> thank you. more than a thousand african-american brokers have won a multi million settlement against bank of merrill lynch, one of the largest race-discrime cases ever, john, i don't know if there is an appeal to come, but at this moment i would imagine the plaintiffs are pretty happy. >> reporter: they are ecstatic, tony. the main player, george mcreynolds, who sued merrill lynch said he did a little jump in his living room when he heard this. but he won't feel vin
as we speak. joining me now to break it down, former chief economic adviser to president george w. bush and a hoover senior fellow. welcome to the show. you know, every time i see something new, you know, amazon drones delivering a package, i see automated checkout at the cbs on the corner. i think that jobs have disappeared and are going to continue to disappear, and they are not coming back. am i wrong? >> you are not wrong. that is a correct observation, but it is n observation that is not unique to this particular time frame. you mentioned structural change, and there has been a structural change, and structural change has been occurring for a long time. if you go back to the 1950's, we have about 35 percent of our workforce is unionized, and manufacturing for the most part. and then if you look at the numbers, say in 2007 the number that just precedes a recession, we had about the same number of people, 14 million in manufacturing in the 50's, 14 million in manufacturing in 2007. but we were producing six times the number of goods in 2007 that we were producing in 1950. basically
george w. bush's economic advisor, now professor at stanford university. welcome back. gdp report today surprisingly strong, up 3.6% at an annual rate for the third quarter. however, there is always a however on this, much of it was unexpected boost to inventories, non-farm inventories, up almost $60 billion. people say that's not sustainable and therefore, the 3.6% is not sustainable. where do you come out on that? >> i think that's actually not right. i think the 3.6% may not be sustainable but it has very little to do with inventories. in fact, what you find is if you look at changes in inventories in one quarter, they tend to predict in a positive direction, not a negative direction what's going to happen in the next quarter. in other words, you have a good quarter for inventories, you're more likely to have a good quarter next quarter, not a bad quarter. the reason for that is that the inventories are essentially forecasting where the economy's going in the future. if the economy is heating up, manufacturers need to produce goods so that they have them on board when the economy is
was here, it was the first george w. bush was the president and we had the first black mayor of new york city. and now we have the first black president of the united states. what do you think he would think of harlem and the united states? >> i think he would think we've come a long way which we have. the fact that we have a black president the united states, who he knew. the fact that harlem is being redeveloped. some for it, some against but progress is sometimes not accepted by everybody. i think nelson mandela would love the fact that we are moving on. we've gotten over the hump. there's a lot of us, we're looking for hope. we've found it. now we're moving on. >> jake tapper who is the anchor of this program said how did he change america? how did he change the world? how did he change america? was i right with that word hope? >> i think it was hope and by example. a lot of people can talk. this man stood for anti-apartheid. he stood in jail. he suffered a lot. you understand? but he did not give up. and he was be going to give in. so if we all had that type of drive and commitment,
-- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and made it real. be achieve more than could expected of any man. today he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. any of us will ever spend time with on this earth. no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. he sacrificed his own will for the freedom of others. his journey from a prisoner to a present embodied
if the white house under george w. bush had organized white house seniors.org as support group for the administration's policy. i suspect some of the democrats who voted against the president -- president bush's proposal would have been out and yelling saying this is really an inappropriate thing to do. look. i understands we have got to find ways to get the government wants to find ways to implement this program but this just struck me as just a little bit -- >> you know what? i can set up with one part about they talk about how important it is to healthy people. provide medical care and we need to fund. this and then they spend a million dollars on a piece of art at the end of september to put in an embassy in london. do we really need that when we are trying to find healthcare for people who are seriously ill and don't have money in this country? i don't buy it when people tell me how important this is when they are doing stupid things like that. >> greta, how about having a $650 billion web site that doesn't work well and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of millions of do
actually on a terrorist watch list. it wasn't until 2008 that legislation was signed by george w. bush administration until 2008 there was actually legislation to take him off that list. can you tell us why it took so long for that to happen and how he got there in the first place? >> well, it actually took a very long time. president bush and condoleezza rice started that process to get nelson mandela and comrades off the terror watch list. frankly the nationalization immigration law, once you labeled someone on a terrorist, it's very difficult to take them off. and that did happen as you said in 2008, it took an act of congress. we actually had to pass legislation, condoleezza went to the hill and asked them to pass the legislation and finally president bush signed that law, signed that legislation into law. but today, i understand from many high ranking anc officials homeland security continues to treat some of them as needing a waiver to get into the united states, which is an embarrassment and what secretary rice said today, at the time, we can't allow president mandela, a man of
that former president george w. bush and laura bush will make the trip with them on air force one. >>> coming up on "the lead" a terrifying scene as passengers on this plane watch their drama on live tv from their seats. what they're saying about the experience. >>> plus, it's one of the biggest sporting events in the world. now the u.s. must survive the so-called group of death to win. i don't just make things for a living i take pride in them. so when my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis was also on display, i'd had it. i filly had a serious talk with my dermatologist. this time, he prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75% skin clearance. and the majority of people were clear or almost clear in just 4 months. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious
. ambassador, there were some nelson mandelan and president george w. bush at the time. i know they joined forces in fighting aids, but he was vehemently opposed against the war in iraq. >> that was true, but the issue was to move the country forward, addressing hiv and aids, and that was the president's signature health program for south africa and for the continent. things we could agree on to serve the needs of a significant number of people, not only in south africa, but around the world. >> what you think we can take as lessons? >> there are a couple. first, it is amazing, the power of an individual that can change the nature of entire country. he demonstrated one person can really make a change in a country. two, the majority of his account judgments happened after he was 72 years old when he got out of prison. or 55y say when i am 65 and retired, i am done, but it is a lesson that the best part of our years are to come. >> good for us, or good for me. >> and, again, the power of humility. certainly, his legacy is enormous in what he did to fight apartheid in south africa, and his ef
, president george w. bush appointed him commissioner of the ins. that was weeks before the attacks of september 11. he served as assistant secretary of the interior in the reagan edmonds ration ms urge annan said the united states senate. he was president and ceo of cross maps technology and is currently a senior fellow at the migration policy institute birth border control and security initiatives. as a board member of human rights first, we've been incredibly blessed with his with an expertise of which have been invaluable to us in navigating complex political challenges. please join me in welcoming board member, jim ziglar. [applause] >> thank you, lease for that very kind and generous introduction. excuse me. it is a particular pleasure and honor for me today to introduce the keynote speaker. senator patrick leahy from the great state of vermont. if a particular pleasure because i consider pat leahy to be a good friend. and yes, for all of you out there who are doubting thomas is, it is possible for republicans and democrats to be friends in washington today. i didn't see was e
congress can strengthen the federal pell grant program. i remember the eight years during the george w. bush administration. the pell grant hoovered about 3,000 to 3,400 a year. and oftentimes cutting it at least 50% to get more money to go to the war in iraq. i was not happy with that. we fought and got it back up to 3,000. in the past several years, democrats have fought to make college for affordable by increasing the pell grant award at least 1,600 from 450 in 2006 to 5,645 in 2014. i lowing it to increase yearly with inflation. before we hear from the panel of witnesses. i want to underscore the importance the federal pell grant program inned advancing college access and affordability. serving approximately 9 million hard working students, the federal pell grant program is the single largest source of federal grant aid which supports college students. according to the president and the chancellors who came to visit me during the period chairman of the committee. they said those were the highest priorities they had. it was to make higher education affordable and assessable and that
government. clinton and george w. bush and the obama of the administration have not joint this issue. i ask what kind of message does this sent the rest of so world with no lack of leadership? we should just sign that we spend hundreds of billions of dollars removing the land mines we use the leahy war victims fund to help victims around the world what are be afraid of? we have another they he law that we cannot export them to show courage only takes a little bit like every one of our allies. is that so difficult? on november 22nd to the great loss this country suffered when kennedy was assassinated. standing right out here at this quarter hundreds of thousands of people on the street yet was so silent you could hear the drones. you could hear the click you could hear the street lights as they changed and the drums of the horses as they came up pennsylvania avenue. i have been thinking about that a lot and what it felt like as the two youngsters still in the year i thought of what kennedy said of the memorable inaugural address to permit the slow undoing the human-rights to which we are com
. significantly higher than the 5.6% unemployment rate which compelled president george w. bush to sign an extension of unemployment benefits when he was in office. i think that the news we have we need toorces that address this problem and extend those unemployment insurance benefits to those individuals. because this is a persistent problem. when president bush signed the law, the average person was unemployed for i believe 17 weeks. for that portion of the unemployed, they fell in november. the number of long-term unemployed stayed pretty steady. that is more evidence we need to address this problem and it would be terrible to tell more than one million families across the country just a few days after christmas that they are out of benefits. we hope that congress will address this challenge. >> how close -- is the white that it isting extending that? we believe that congress should extend unemployment insurance. the vehicle that they used to do that is less important than the fact that they do it. i will not negotiate from the podium about how that gets done. discussionsongoing and
, is joe watkinss, republican strategist and former white house aide for president george h.w. bush. let's start with that november jobs number. joe, why don't you take it away. employers adding more jobs than expected, unemployment rate at %, is this good, too good to be true or what? >> well, those are good numbers. i prefer to see the rate of unemployment number go down instead of going up. you have to look at what's behind the numbers. the labor force is not growing and the fact that labor force is not growing means that now we have to create fewer jobs in order to keep the rate of unemployment level. so at one point a few years ago we needed to create about 150,000 jobs a month in order for that rate of unemployment to stay even. now we only need to create about 100,000 jobs a month in order for that rate of unemployment to stay flat and if we exceed that as we've done this month the last couple months, last few months, a downturn in the rate of unemployment. the labor force participation rate is the question, is 63% still, it was 63%, four years ago or -- in 2007, it was at 67%. so
? let's ask james baker, former secretary of state for george w. bush, chief of staff under reagan, former treasury secretary as well, jim, you met with nelson mandela right after his release from prison. who was the mandela you talked to? >> well, he was -- he had been in prison for 27 years and i met with him and a lot of his associates in the african national congress. what was interesting to me about that meeting is nobody else on his side said one word. it was quite clear who was in charge even though he had only gotten out of prison maybe three or four weeks before. he was very dignified. he was a man of great dignity and i say endearing and enduring dignity. he was an icon of freedom. he was an icon of human rights. he was an icon of reconciliation and forgiveness. he forgave his captors. he didn't engage in retribution. unlike so many african leaders who once they get power, they want to keep it for life, he voluntarily stepped down after a few years in power. >> and jim, the other thing is -- i should say mr. secretary, is that he was the guy what was critical of the u.s.
, george w. bush. "president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace, and our world is better off because of his example." it is a type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white to share feelings. south african native charlize theron, "my thoughts and love to nelson mandela's family. rest in peace madiba. you will be missed but your impact on this world will live forever." director spike lee posted this simple message. and then this one from nasa, intergalactic message. from the space shuttle. the space shuttle posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. and crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from mandela's own twitter account. death is inevitable. when a man has done what he considers to be a duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. a virtual memorial on social media. electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world together. jim avila, abc news, new york. >> great one that came in from the dalai la
it out anytime. fromquotes and statements former presidents including this from george w. bush. president mandela was one of the greatest forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore the burden with dignity and grace and our world is better off because of his example. the associated press is reporting a president obama will travel to south africa for the funeral surfaces of nelson mandela. details are still pending. we will hear more later in the day. this is from "usa today." death of a giant. nelson mandela, whose successful struggle against south africa's system of racial segregation and discrimination made him a global symbol for the cause of human rights. caller: i would like to thank you for acknowledging nelson mandela's life. i want to say that it is a privilege to know that in this day and time that we did have someone who would risk his life for freedom. i understand what the young man was saying about the man who died who was the first man to the moon. that is an honor as well. been unders have oppression for a long time. we live on earth. it is those on earth who need
with the seattle mariners worth $240 million. the mariners, by the way, haven't reached the playoffs since george w. bush's first year in office. ouch. >> take a look at this. terrifying video. a boeing 777 trying to land at an airport in the uk. but powerful winds forced it sideways before going back up in the air. we're told the gusts hit 50 miles per hour, and passengers -- look at it going back up. passengers on the plane watched the whole thing on live television as they were sitting on their seats. the plane tried landing twice before diverting to another airport. >>> and just days after that train derailed in new york, killing four people, we've heard the words like highway hypnosis and in a daze, when it comes to that operator. even though we still don't know exactly what happened in those crucial moments before that crash, cnn's chris freights gets a behind the scenes look in the front of a commuter train. >> as passengers rushed through their morning commute, engineer jeff klein scales 12 feet into this locomotive and gets ready to take responsibility for hundreds of people's lives. with
, former president george h.w. bush said mandela was a man of tremendous moral courage who changed the course of history in his country. the dalai lama sharing his thoughts. >> at this moment, firstly, very sad. but at the same time, the certainness -- other people who have the sense or feeling, then we must translate that sadness, translate into determination. we must continue so his spirit is very important. >> celebrities expressing their sentiments. oprah says one of the greatest moments of my life was to be invited to his home and get to know him. he was everything you ever heard and more. humble and unscathed by bitterness and always told a good joke. being in his presence was like sitting with grace and majesty at the same time. he will always be my hero. in just a few minutes, we'll have a live report from johannesburg. >>> first, though, the other big story we're following today, and that is the jobs report. now less than -- where's our clock? 26 minutes, less than 30 minutes away from the jobs report. joining us now mark zandi, christian weller at the university of massac
sacrifice. >>> george h.w. bush was in the presidency when nelson mandela was released from prison, and he put out a statement yesterday recalling his wonder at mandela's ability to forgive his jailers. he said . . . saying they would never reach proprosperity if the country continued to build up their arsenal of nuclear westminster. weapons. >>. well a major winter storm is sweeping across the plains and across dallas for dallas-fort w. take a look at the temperatures. they were looking at partly cloudy skies on friday. a mixture of sleet and freezing rain and all of that ice was piling up on the roadways. we are looking at temperatures iat temperatures across into the 20's where we are looking at toa as and into oklahoma and pushing towards the east. >> that helps identify the rain-snow line. it's going to be all rain for you. back here toward memphis and dallas and fort worth we are looking at rain, snow and also ice. we could see anywhere between four and six inches into oklahoma and on into arkansas. we are going to look at anywhere from up to an inch of ice across portions of memphis
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